My experiences with the cold and chilblains

Date: 19/11/2022 Author: Darío O.

Chilblains are an ailment that has attacked me since I was a child, and that will surely do so more harshly in old age. Known more popularly among my childhood friends as “blood sausage fingers”, an undeniable similarity of course, except for the black of the blood sausage and the red of the chilblain.

This affliction is characterized by inflammation, itching and, as I said, redness, and it usually comes hand in hand with the cold season. They also say, or so I've heard, that it's more common in women, damn my luck, that I belong to the other sex and still suffer from them, but genetics are capricious. In my particular case, I am always greeted with swelling of the middle finger of my right hand, spreading, if I don't take care of myself in time, through the rest of the fingers and even to the other hand (thus suggesting that I have better circulation in one than in the other hand). in the other). In theory, they can also appear on the feet (and even ears), but my bad luck does not reach that far, because it has never happened to me, a consequence, perhaps, of the fact that one always wears socks, but one does not always wear gloves . In this regard, I have to make the recommendation that I consider most effective against chilblains: gloves. As soon as I realized they were associated with cold and wet weather, I started wearing gloves more often and saw an almost instant improvement. Other "remedies" that I tried were counterproductive, such as bringing my hands closer to a fire or stove. This sudden change in temperature seemed, on some occasions, to make my chilblains worse. So my only advice to the poor man or woman who suffers from them like me is to get some good gloves that keep them warm. Other "remedies" that I tried were counterproductive, such as bringing my hands closer to a fire or stove. This sudden change in temperature seemed, on some occasions, to make my chilblains worse. So my only advice to the poor man or woman who suffers from them like me is to get some good gloves that keep them warm. Other "remedies" that I tried were counterproductive, such as bringing my hands closer to a fire or stove. This sudden change in temperature seemed, on some occasions, to make my chilblains worse. So my only advice to the poor man or woman who suffers from them like me is to get some good gloves that keep them warm.

Writing this about the gloves, I just realized an anecdote that may not be relevant, but I think it's worth attaching here for its humor.

I was buying gloves a few months ago in a store whose name I will not say when I stood next to a man who was also doing the same job as me, but with the particularity that he was looking for gloves that allowed the use, through tissue, touch screens; while I was more concerned with thermal protection (and price). Well, this good man, in order to make sure that the "touch" glove actually worked, he kindly grabbed the mannequin's hand, on which the glove was placed, and tried to interact with the mannequin's hand with the screen of his mobile, obtaining few results.

By breaking a spear in favor of man and not being smart, I have to admit something that I did not know prior to your Google search: today most of the mobile screens are capacitive, this is to say that the mobile is from contact by electrical conduction (yes, we have electrons in our fingers). Although it is true that, without a human hand in between, the screen probably does not know about the pulsation; depending on how the glove was made, the screen of your mobile could be unlocked, even with the hand of a mannequin.

 

I'm hot, and people laugh

-Luis de Gongora.